2016年3月6日 星期日

Picture Book: Kitty-in-Boots, The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter,


【Peter Rabbit 出硬幣】
50便士印上這隻可愛兔仔,粉絲們都會爭相收藏,唔捨得用!
你喜歡 Peter Rabbit 嗎?這隻家傳戶曉的童話主角要出硬幣了!今年是其作者 Beatrix Potter 150 週年冥誕,英國皇家造幣廠 The Royal Mint 特別推出印上這隻可愛兔仔的50便士,讓 Peter Rabbit…
HK.STYLE.YAHOO.COM
Rebecca Mead on the artistry and popular charm of Beatrix Potter, and the discovery of the author's “lost” book.



“The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots,” a “lost” Beatrix Potter work to be published this…
NYER.CM|由 REBECCA MEAD 上傳








THE GUARDIAN
Where has 'Kitty-in-Boots' been hiding?



A new Beatrix Potter story is to be published after more than 100 years
BBC.IN


絵本(えほん)とは、その主たる内容がで描かれている書籍で絵画(イラストレーション)を主体とした書籍のうち、物語などテーマを設けて文章を付与し、これを読ませるものである。

日本における絵本[編集]

平安時代絵巻物を起源とし、室町時代奈良絵本江戸時代草双紙と歴史をたどることができる。また、絵手本のことを指して絵本と呼んだ例もある。特に江戸時代の赤本が、子供向けに作られた絵本といえる。また、教育的な要素の強いものとしては中村惕斎による『訓蒙図彙』が挙げられる。明治時代になって欧米の印刷技術や絵本が入り、現在のような絵本の形態になってきた。絵本は、絵だけのものもあるが、基本的には絵と言葉によるコラボレーションであり、ページをめくるという行為が重視される。

Picture book

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see Picture Book (disambiguation).

Peter Rabbit with his family, from The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter, 1902
picture book combines visual and verbal narratives in a book format, most often aimed at young children. The images in picture books use a range of media such as oil paints, acrylics, watercolor, and pencil, among others. Two of the earliest books with something like the format picture books still retain now were Heinrich Hoffmann's Struwwelpeter from 1845 and Beatrix Potter's The Tale of Peter Rabbit from 1902. Some of the best-known picture books are Robert McCloskey's Make Way for DucklingsDr. SeussThe Cat In The Hat, and Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are. The Caldecott Medal(established 1938) and Kate Greenaway Medal (established 1955) are awarded annually for illustrations in children's literature. From the mid-1960s several children's literature awards include a category for picture books.

Characteristics[edit]


A child with an illustrated book ofThree Billy Goats Gruff
Any book that pairs a narrative format with pictures can be categorized as a picture book; as kiefer states: "In the best picture books, the illustrations are as much a part of the experience with the book as the written text."[1]
Oftentimes the author and illustrator are two different people. Once an editor in a publishing house has accepted a manuscript from an author, the editor then selects an illustrator.
Picture books may or may not have page numbers, and they cover a wide variety of themes, target audiences, and subgenres.

Target audiences[edit]

Picture books are most often aimed at young children, and while some may have very basic language especially designed to help children develop their reading skills, most are written with vocabulary a child can understand but not necessarily read. For this reason, picture books tend to have two functions in the lives of children: they are first read to young children by adults, and then children read them themselves once they begin learning to read.
Some picture books are published with content aimed at older children or even adults. Tibet: Through the Red Box, by Peter Sis, is one example of a picture book aimed at an adult audience.

Subgenres[edit]

There are several subgenres among picture books, including alphabet booksconcept booksearly readersnursery rhymes, andtoy booksBoard books - picture books published on a hard cardboard - are often intended for small children to use and play with; cardboard is used for the cover as well as the pages, and is more durable than paper. Another category is movable books, such as pop-up books, which employ paper engineering to make parts of the page pop up or stand up when pages are opened.The Wheels on the Bus, by Paul O. Zelinsky, is one example of a bestseller pop-up picture book.

Early picture books[edit]


A reprint of the 1658 illustrated Orbis Pictus
Orbis Pictus from 1658 by John Amos Comenius was the earliest illustrated book specifically for children. It is something of a children's encyclopedia and is illustrated bywoodcuts.[2] A Little Pretty Pocket-Book from 1744 by John Newbery was the earliest illustrated storybook marketed as pleasure reading in English.[3] The German children's book Struwwelpeter (literally "Shaggy-Peter") from 1845 by Heinrich Hoffmann was one of the earliest examples of modern picturebook design. Collections of Fairy tales from early nineteenth century, like those by the Brothers Grimm or Hans Christian Andersen were sparsely illustrated, but beginning in the middle of the century, collections were published with images by illustrators like Gustave DoréFedor FlinzerGeorge Cruikshank,[4] Vilhelm PedersenIvan Bilibin and John BauerAndrew Lang's twelve Fairy Books published between 1889 and 1910 were illustrated by among others Henry J. Ford and Lancelot SpeedLewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, illustrated by John Tenniel in 1866 was one of the first highly successful entertainment books for children.

Alice from Lewis Carroll'sAlice's Adventures in Wonderland, illustration by John Tenniel, 1866
Toy books were introduced in the latter half of the 19th century, small paperbound books with art dominating the text. These had a larger proportion of pictures to words than earlier books, and many of their pictures were in color.[5] The best of these were illustrated by the triumvirate of English illustrators Randolph CaldecottWalter Crane, and Kate Greenaway whose association with colour printer and wood engraver Edmund Evans produced books of great quality.[6] In the late 19th and early 20th century a small number of American and British artists made their living illustrating children's books, like Rose O'NeillArthur RackhamCicely Mary BarkerWilly Pogany,Edmund DulacW. Heath RobinsonHoward Pyle, or Charles Robinson. Generally, these illustrated books had eight to twelve pages of illustrated pictures or plates accompanying a classic children's storybook.

Cover of Babes in the Wood, illustrated by Randolph Caldecott
Beatrix Potter's The Tale of Peter Rabbit was published in 1902 to immediate success. Peter Rabbit was Potter's first of many The Tale of..., including The Tale of Squirrel NutkinThe Tale of Benjamin BunnyThe Tale of Tom Kitten, and The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck, to name but a few which were published in the years leading up to 1910. Swedish author Elsa Beskow wrote and illustrated some 40 children's stories and picture books between 1897–1952. Andrew Lang's twelve Fairy Books published between 1889 and 1910 were illustrated by among others Henry J. Ford and Lancelot Speed. In the US, illustrated stories for children appeared in magazines likeLadies Home JournalGood HousekeepingCosmopolitanWoman's Home Companion intended for mothers to read to their children. Some cheap periodicals appealing to the juvenile reader started to appear in the early 20th century, often with uncredited illustrations. Helen Bannerman'sLittle Black Sambo was published in 1899, and went through numerous printings and versions during the first decade of the 20th century. Little Black Sambo was part of a series of small-format books called The Dumpy Books for Children, published by British publisher Grant Richards between 1897 and 1904.

Early to mid 20th century[edit]


Title page from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum from 1900
L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was published in 1900, and Baum created a number of other successful Oz-oriented books in the period from 1904 to 1920. Frank Baum wanted to create a modern day fairy tale since he loved fairy tales as a child. In 1910, American illustrator and author Rose O'Neill's first children’s book was published, The Kewpies and Dottie Darling. More books in the Kewpie series followed: The Kewpies Their Book in 1912 and The Kewpie Primer 1916. In 1918, Johnny Gruelle wrote and illustrated Raggedy Ann and in 1920 followed up with Raggedy Andy Stories. Other Gruelle books included Beloved BelindaEddie Elephant, andFriendly Fairies.
In 1913, Cupples & Leon published a series of 15 All About books, emulating the form and size of the Beatrix Potter books, All About Peter RabbitAll About The Three BearsAll About Mother Goose, and All About Little Red Hen. The latter, along with several others, was illustrated byJohnny GruelleWanda Gág's Millions of Cats was published in 1928 and became the first picture book to receive a Newbery Medal runner-up award. Wanda Gág followed with The Funny Thing in 1929, Snippy and Snappy in 1931, and then The ABC Bunny in 1933, which garnered her a second Newbery runner-up award.
In 1931, Jean de Brunhoff's first Babar book, The Story Of Babar was published in France, followed by The Travels of Babar thenBabar The King. In 1930, Marjorie Flack authored and illustrated Angus and the Ducks, followed in 1931 by Angus And The Cats, then in 1932, Angus Lost. Flack authored another book in 1933, The Story about Ping, illustrated by Kurt Wiese. The Elson Basic Reader was published in 1930 and introduced the public to Dick and Jane. In 1930 The Little Engine That Could was published, illustrated by Lois Lenski. In 1954 it was illustrated anew by George and Doris Hauman. It spawned an entire line of books and related paraphernalia and coined the refrain "I think I can! I think I can!". In 1936, Munro Leaf's The Story of Ferdinand was published, illustrated by Robert LawsonFerdinand was the first picture book to crossover into pop cultureWalt Disney produced an animated feature film along with corresponding merchandising materials. In 1938 to Dorothy Lathrop was awarded the firstCaldecott Medal for her illustrations in Animals of the Bible, written by Helen Dean Fish. Thomas Handforth won the second Caldecott Medal in 1939, for Mei Li, which he also wrote. Ludwig BemelmansMadeline was published in 1939 and was selected as a Caldecott Medal runner-up, today known as a Caldecott Honor book.
In 1942, Simon & Schuster began publishing the Little Golden Books, a series of inexpensive, well illustrated, high quality children's books. The eighth book in the series, The Poky Little Puppy, is the top selling children's book of all time.[7] Many of the books were bestsellers[8] including The Poky Little PuppyTootleScuffy the TugboatThe Little Red Hen. Several of the illustrators for the Little Golden Books later became staples within the picture book industry. Corinne MalvernTibor Gergely,Gustaf TenggrenFeodor RojankovskyRichard ScarryEloise Wilkin, and Garth Williams. In 1947 Goodnight Moon written byMargaret Wise Brown and illustrated by Clement Hurd was published. By 1955, such picture book classics as Make Way for DucklingsThe Little HouseCurious George, and Eloise, had all been published. In 1955 the first book was published in theMiffy series by Dutch author and illustrator Dick Bruna.
In 1937, Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel,) at the time a successful graphic artist and humorist, published his first book for children, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street. It was immediately successful, and Seuss followed up with The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins in 1938, followed by The King's Stilts in 1939, and Horton Hatches the Egg in 1940, all published byRandom House. From 1947 to 1956 Seuss had twelve children's picture books published. Dr. Seuss created The Cat in the Hatin reaction to a Life magazine article by John Hersey in lamenting the unrealistic children in school primers books. Seuss rigidly limited himself to a small set of words from an elementary school vocabulary list, then crafted a story based upon two randomly selected words—cat and hat. Up until the mid-1950s, there was a degree of separation between illustrated educational books and illustrated picture books. That changed with The Cat in the Hat in 1957.
Because of the success of The Cat In The Hat an independent publishing company was formed, called Beginner Books. The second book in the series was nearly as popular, The Cat in the Hat Comes Back, published in 1958. Other books in the series were Sam and the Firefly (1958), Green Eggs and Ham (1960), Are You My Mother? (1960), Go, Dog. Go! (1961), Hop on Pop(1963), and Fox in Socks (1965). Creators in the Beginner Book series were Stan and Jan BerenstainP. D. EastmanRoy McKie, and Helen Palmer Geisel (Seuss' wife). The Beginner Books dominated the children's picture book market of the 1960s.
Between 1957 and 1960 Harper & Brothers published a series of sixteen "I Can Read" books. Little Bear was the first of the series. Written by Else Holmelund Minarik and illustrated by a then relatively unknown Maurice Sendak, the two collaborated on three other "I Can Read" books over the next three years. From 1958 to 1960, Syd Hoff wrote and illustrated four "I Can Read" books: Danny and the DinosaurSammy The SealJulius, and Oliver.

Mid to late 20th century[edit]

In 1949 American writer and illustrator Richard Scarry began his career working on the Little Golden Books series. His Best Word Book Ever from 1963 has sold 4 million copies. In total Scarry wrote and illustrated more than 250 books and more than 100 million of his books have been sold worldwide.[9] In 1963, Where The Wild Things Are by American writer and illustrator Maurice Sendak was published. It has been adapted into other media several times, including an animated short in 1973, a 1980 opera, and, in 2009, a live-action feature film adaptation directed by Spike Jonze. By 2008 it had sold over 19 million copies worldwide.[10] American illustrator and author Gyo Fujikawa created more than 50 books between 1963 and 1990. Her work has been translated into 17 languages and published in 22 countries. Her most popular books, Babies and Baby Animals, have sold over 1.7 million copies in the U.S.[11] Fujikawa is recognized for being the earliest mainstream illustrator of picture books to include children of many races in her work.[12][13][14]
Most of the Moomin books by Finnish author Tove Jansson were novels, but several Moomin picture books were also published between 1952 and 1980, like Who Will Comfort Toffle? (1960) and The Dangerous Journey (1977). The Barbapapa series of books by Annette Tison and Talus Taylor was published in France in the 1970s. They feature the shapeshifting pink blob Barbapapa and his numerous colorful children. The Mr. Men series of 40-some books by English author and illustrated Roger Hargreaves started in 1971. The Snowman by Raymond Briggs was published in Britain in 1978 and was entirely wordless. It was made into an Oscar nominated animated cartoon that has been shown every year since on British television.
Japanese author and illustrator Mitsumasa Anno has published a number of picture books beginning in 1968 with Mysterious Pictures. In his "Journey" books a tiny character travels through depictions of the culture of various countries. Everyone Poopswas first published in Japan in 1977, written and illustrated by the prolific children's author Tarō Gomi. It has been translated into several languages. Australian author Margaret Wild has written more than 40 books since 1984 and won several awards. In 1987 the first book was published in the Where's Wally? (known as Where's Waldo? in the United States and Canada) series by the British illustrator Martin Handford. The books were translated into many languages and the franchise also spawned a TV series, a comic strip and a series of video games. Since 1989 over 20 books have been created in the Elmer the Patchwork Elephantseries by the British author David McKee. They have been translated in 40 languages and adapted into a children's TV series.

Awards[edit]

In 1938, the American Library Association (ALA) began presenting annually the Caldecott Medal to the most distinguished children's book illustration published in the year. The Caldecott Medal was established as a sister award to the ALA's Newbery Medal, which was awarded to a children's books "for the most distinguished American children's book published the previous year" and presented annually beginning in 1922. During the mid-forties to early-fifties honorees included Marcia BrownBarbara CooneyRoger DuvoisinBerta and Elmer HaderRobert LawsonRobert McCloskeyDr. SeussMaurice SendakIngri and Edgar Parin d'AulaireLeo PolitiTasha Tudor, and Leonard Weisgard.
The Kate Greenaway Medal was established in the United Kingdom in 1955 in honour of the children's illustrator, Kate Greenaway. The medal is given annually to an outstanding work of illustration in children's literature. It is awarded by Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP). Since 1965 the Deutscher Jugendliteraturpreis (German Youth literature prize) includes a category for picture books. The Danish Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration has been awarded since 1966. The Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, first presented in 1967, includes a category for picture books. In 2006, the ALA started awarding the Geisel Award, named after Dr. Seuss, to the most distinguished beginning reader book. The award is presented to both the author and illustrator, in "literary and artistic achievements to engage children in reading."

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Kiefer, 156
  2. Jump up^ Hunt, p. 217
  3. Jump up^ Hunt, p. 668
  4. Jump up^ Hunt, p. 221
  5. Jump up^ Whalley, p.
  6. Jump up^ Hunt, p. 674
  7. Jump up^ according to a 2001 list of bestselling children's hardback books compiled by Publishers Weekly.
  8. Jump up^ Four of the top eight books on the Publishers Weekly list are Little Golden Books.
  9. Jump up^ New York Times obituary of Richard Scarry
  10. Jump up^ Thornton, Matthew (February 4, 2008) "Wild Things All Over"Publishers Weekly
  11. Jump up^ Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 23 April 2007.
  12. Jump up^ Gyo Fujikawa, a Children's Illustrator Forging the Way, Dr. Andrea Wyman. Versed, Sept. 2005. URL accessed 21 July 2009.
  13. Jump up^ Penguin Group Diversity. URL accessed 23 April 2007.
  14. Jump up^ Ask Art:Gyo Fujikawa.
     URL accessed 23 April 2007.

Source[edit]

External links[edit]

Children's Picture Book Database at Miami University

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