2017年3月27日 星期一

川端康成の長編小説:山の音



山の音 - Wikipedia

https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/山の音
山の音』(やまのおと)は、川端康成の長編小説。戦後日本文学の最高峰と評され、第7回(1954年度)野間文芸賞を受賞。川端の作家的評価を決定づけた作品として ...


川端康成,譯者:葉渭渠





‘The Sound of the Mountain’: Yasunari Kawabata’s slow-burning meditation on getting older
BY LOUISE GEORGE KITTAKA
SPECIAL TO THE JAPAN TIMES
MAR 25, 2017



The first Japanese winner of the Nobel Prize in literature in 1968, Yasunari Kawabata, deals with the gradual decline that comes with aging in “The Sound of the Mountain.”

The Sound of the Mountain, by Yasunari Kawabata, Translated by Edward G. Seidensticker.
276 pages
TUTTLE, Fiction.

Family patriarch Shingo Ogata, a businessman nearing retirement, lives with his wife, son and daughter-in-law in Kamakura. Shingo has an affinity for the natural world, which serves as a metaphor for his feelings and reactions to events around him.

He is forced to ponder his own past performance as husband and father when both the marriages of his adult children run into trouble: Daughter Fusako leaves her husband, arriving home with her two small daughters, while her brother, Shuichi, neglects his own wife, Kikuyo, and brazenly carries on an affair. Shingo sees something of a kindred spirit in the devoted and gentle Kikuyo, and his affections for his daughter-in-law are a tad more than fatherly. At the same time, he feels guilt over a long-held infatuation for his late sister-in-law.

Despite his self-perceived shortcomings, Shingo is a sympathetic protagonist, and as he takes action to end his son’s affair and bring him back into the family fold, the book closes with a tentative sense of hope for a happier future for the Ogatas.

Kawabata delivers his characters and their dialogue in sensitively written prose that moves at a leisurely pace, and this domestic drama of is best enjoyed in the same manner.




First English-language edition
Author Yasunari Kawabata
Original title 山の音
Yama no Oto
Translator Edward Seidensticker
Country Japan
Language Japanese

Publication date 1949–1954

Published in English 1970 (Knopf)
Media type Print (paperback)

2017年3月26日 星期日

COUSIN BETTY By Honore De Balzac 【貝姨】(傅雷)


 COUSIN BETTY By Honore De Balzac 【貝姨】(傅雷)

“Life cannot go on without a great deal of forgetting.”
―from COUSIN BETTE by Honoré de Balzac
A hypnotic story of hatred, revenge and catastrophe in which Cousin Bette exacts a terrible price from the rich relations who use and humiliate her. This book portrays the world of post-Napoleonic France, where commercial greed and sexual debauchery are rampant among a demoralized ruling class. Along with his wide descriptive range and the astute understanding of society for which he is celebrated, Balzac had immense psychological penetration. All these qualities are fully evident in his story of the ferocious dissembler Cousin Bette and the dense nineteenth-century Parisian milieu in which she plots a terrible revenge on her patronizing relatives. Introduction by Michael Tilby; Translation by James Waring. READ an excerpt here: http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/…/cousin-bette-by-honore…/#

~~~~

COUSIN BETTY
By Honore De Balzac
Translated by James Waring
出處末章:
Of course, everybody was quite satisfied and easy. The young people and
the Baroness lauded the model father to the skies, forgetting the death
of the two uncles. Life cannot go on without much forgetting!
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1749/1749-0.txt
沒有遺忘,人生是過不下去的! (傅雷【貝姨】安徽文藝,p.558)

兩英譯本都有"大量(much/a great deal)遺忘",傅雷的【貝姨】缺此形容詞。

傅雷末章有幾處"雙關語",此英文本從缺。
~~~~~


Cousin Bette - Page 460 - Google Books Result

https://books.google.com.tw/books?isbn=0199553947
Honoré de Balzac - 2008 - ‎Fiction
His wife and children praised the father of the family to the skies, forgetting the deaths of the two uncles! Life cannot go on without a great deal of forgetting.



覺翁書畫─傅狷夫先生家族捐贈文物

覺翁書畫─傅狷夫先生家族捐贈文物特展
覺翁書畫─傅狷夫先生家族捐贈文物特展
  • 展期:2017/01/25~2017/04/25
  • 陳列室:北部院區 展覽區一 105,107

展覽說明

傅狷夫先生(1910-2007),原名抱青,後為避傅抱石之名,改號狷夫。亦號雪華邨人,七十歲後又號覺翁。浙江杭州人。其書畫造詣固深,1949年來臺後更創新局,發展出獨特的「連綿草」書體,並以臺灣山岳、雲海、浪濤等題材入畫,而有「臺灣山水的代言人」之譽。書畫雙絕,桃李滿門,今日藝壇中堅多出自其門下,對當代書畫界影響深遠。

傅狷夫先生家族於民國99年至101年間,慨然捐贈先生相關書畫134件,含書法63件與繪畫71件,及所用印章100方,由本院永久典藏。內中除先生親筆書畫,還包括其師王仁治(1869-1932)、尊翁傅御(1880-1959)與夫人席德芳(1916-)之作,以及藝壇友人于右任(1879-1964)、溥心畬(1896-1963)等為其畫室所題寫的榜額。印章則多出自王壯為(1909-1998)、吳平(1920-)等當代篆刻名家之手。這批作品是展現先生師承、家學、交誼與藝術成就的珍貴寶藏,不僅豐富了本院收藏,使故宮與臺灣本土藝壇的連結益發緊密,更可據此以見傳統水墨畫於當代的轉變樞機。

為感謝傅狷夫先生家族的盛情高誼,本院特舉辦「覺翁書畫──傅狷夫先生家族捐贈文物特展」,精選78件書畫作品與53方印章展陳,以茲紀念。展出作品橫跨先生藝事創作的各個時期,分「西泠遊子」、「大草連綿」、「山水臺灣」、「神契海嶽」、「耄耋墨境」、「心香傳芳」等六個單元,冀能完整呈現先生之藝術與生活面向。適值先生逝世十周年,亦藉此展覽向傅狷夫先生致敬。

人和書:編輯看很多投稿,每天都在寫退稿信




人和書






廖志峰兄前幾天說,他每天都在寫退稿信。



瞿欣怡


這一年來,因為工作的關係,收到很多投稿,也見了一些渴望出書的新手作家。

最大的感想是,現實世界非常殘酷。

見到新人作家,我內心都有很多嚴厲的問題,也許沒有問出口,但看著他們,我心裡都會把問題轉過一遍又一遍,回家後讀稿子,還是會問過無數次。


你的書要賣給誰?

你的獨特性是什麼?

你的文章可以打動人嗎?

一個陌生人,為什麼要花三百元買你的書?

最後一個至為關鍵的問題是:你為什麼要出書?

回答得了最後一個問題,意志夠堅定,心志夠強悍,才不會被前面的無數殘酷問題打敗。

這些殘酷的問題,我也被質疑過很多次。不只是面對出版社,在做雜誌時,我也一次一次被問:「讀者為什麼要花一百元買這本雜誌?」

第一次被問,覺得很刺耳尖銳,後來漸漸明白,如果沒有人買,你做得再厲害都沒用,因為根本沒人看。有好的議題沒用,還要找到好的溝通方法(不是聳動,而是打動)。

當然,不是只有我能問別人問題,新作者也會問我問題。昨天有人問我:編輯跟作者的關係是什麼?

一定有很多很多總編輯比我專業,比我有經驗。我能夠給出的,除了專業技術外,就是陪伴。我走過上面這些路,知道剛出道的作家必須經歷很多很多關卡,從概念、寫作、交稿、出版、行銷,一直到面對銷售,每一個關卡都很不容易。

我走過,經歷過不斷地自我懷疑、擔憂、小小的開心,又開始自我懷疑,是很不愉快又充滿挫折的迴旋。

因為經過這些,所以我一開始會很嚴厲挑戰作者,我這麼做不是故意找麻煩,而是我必須先對作者嚴格,他們在市場上才不會受傷。我不伺候我的作者,但我比他們早一步站在可能跌倒的地方,承接他們。

現實世界真的很殘酷,但誰不用穿越這些殘酷呢?

2017年3月25日 星期六

the Evanion collection, 'Golden Age' of posters, Abram Games, Posters: A Concise History, International Poster Annual



Soviet propaganda, old liqueurs, and advertisements for 60s airlines— start…
CREATORS.VICE.COM


Henry Evans died ‪#‎onthisday‬ in 1905. He collected 5,000 items of Victorian ephemera now known as the Evanion collection. Here are some highlights http://bit.ly/1HRWyP4
Image: Seed catalogue by Webb and Sons, the Queen's Seedsmen, 1885.


Evanion Collection of ephemera

Over 2,000 adverts and posters from Victorian daily life, collected by the stage magician and ventriloquist, Henry Evans - Evanion to his audience.
Image of Helen Peden

Helen Peden

Curator, British Collections 1801-1914

The British Library now owns some 5,000 items from the 'Evanion' collection, originally purchased by the British Museum in 1895. They include many colourful posters and handbills produced as publicity for the various entertainments staged in music halls and theatres, as well as for exhibitions, circuses and other popular events. Trade catalogues, price lists and advertising materials that were once in general circulation reflect both the necessities and the aspirations of contemporary life.

Curator's choice

Helen Peden highlights personal favourite items from the collection

Ticket for a "Wonderful and Amusing Entertainment" by M. Evanion

Henry Evans (ca.1832-1905) was born in Kennington, South London. Under the stage name "Evanion" h...

Trade card of James Pain, pyrotechnist 4228

Charles Brock's spectacular firework fetes at the Crystal Palace during the 1860s and 70s inspire...

Advertisement for cocoa products manufactured by J S Fry & Sons

Dr Joseph Fry, a Quaker apothecary with remarkable business acumen, took advantage of the opportu...

Advertisement for Edward Grove, fashionable tailor and complete outfitter

At the beginning of the 19th century, all fashionable clothing for the upper classes was made by ...

Programme for the Canterbury Theatre of Varieties, Monday 25 March 1889

The popular Canterbury Theatre of Varieties was the first of the great music halls. Opened in 185...


******



從Image and Code by E. H. Gombrich 一文的例子 我知道有
International Poster Annual  至晚1951年起
The 1950 International Poster Annual, published in Switzerland,

International poster annual 1954
 




International poster annual 1954 [Hardcover]

Arthur (editor). Niggli (Author)

Japanese Posters: The First 100 Years

 ----

Abram Games: Maximum Meaning, Minimum Means 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snk-n8IYWr0

Catherine Moriarty on The Genius of Design

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Festival of Britain emblem - the Festival Star - designed by Abram Games, from the cover of the South Bank Exhibition Guide, 1951
Abram Games OBE, RDI (1914, Whitechapel, London — 1996, London) was a British graphic designer.

Contents

Early years

Born Abraham Games in Whitechapel, London on July 29th, the day after World War I began in 1914, he was the son of Joseph Games, a Latvian photographer, and Sarah, a seamstress born on the border of Russia and Poland. His father anglicized the family name to Games when Abram was 12.[1] Games left Hackney Downs School at the age of 16 and went to London's St. Martins School of Art (today the Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design). Disillusioned by the teaching at St Martins and worried about the expense of studying there, Games left after two terms. However, while working as a "studio boy" in commercial design firm Askew-Young in London 1932-36, he was attending night classes in life drawing. He was fired from this position due to his jumping over four chairs as a prank.[1] In 1934, his entry was second in the Health Council Competition and, in 1935, won a poster competition for the London City Council. 1936-40, he was on his own as a freelance poster artist.

Career


ATS recruitment poster for the Ministry of Information.
The style of his work — refined but vigorous compared to the work of contemporaries — has earned him a place in the pantheon of the best of 20th-century graphic designers. In acknowledging his power as a propagandist, he claimed, “I wind the spring and the public, in looking at the poster, will have that spring released in its mind.” Because of the length of his career — over six decades — his work is essentially a record of the era's social history. Some of Britain's most iconic images include those by Games. An example is the "Join the ATS" propaganda poster of 1941, nicknamed the "Blonde Bombshell" recruitment poster. From 1942, during World War II, Games's service as the Official War Artist for posters resulted in 100 or so posters. His work is recognized for its "striking color, bold graphic ideas, and beautifully integrated typography".[2]
1946, he resumed his freelance practice and worked for clients such Shell, Financial Times, Guinness, British Airways, London Transport, El Al, and the United Nations. He designed stamps for Britain, Ireland, Israel, Jersey, and Portugal.[2] Also, he designed the logo for JFS situated currently in north-west London. There were also book jackets for Penguin Books and logos for the 1951 Festival of Britain (winning the 1948 competition) and the 1965 Queen's Award to Industry. Evidence of his pioneering contributions is the first (1953) moving on-screen symbol of BBC Television. He also produced murals.
1946-53, Games was a visiting lecturer in graphic design at London's Royal College of Art; 1958, was awarded the Order of the British Empire (OBE) for services to graphic design; 1959, was appointed a Royal Designer for Industry (RDI).[2] In the 1950s and of Jewish heritage, he was known to have spent some time in Israel where, among other activities, he designed stamps for the Israeli Post Office and taught a course in postage-stamp design.
Games was also an industrial designer of sorts. Activities in this discipline included the design of the 1947 Cona vacuum coffee maker (produced from 1949, reworked in 1959 and still in production) and inventions such as a circular vacuum and the early 1960s portable handheld duplicating machine by Gestetner. But the duplicator was not put into production due to the demise of mimeography.
In arriving at a poster design, Games would render up to 30 small preliminary sketches and then combine two or three into the final one. In the developmental process, he would work small because, he asserted, if poster designs “don't work an inch high, they will never work.” He would also call on a large number of photographic images as source material. Purportedly, if a client rejected a proposed design (which seldom occurred), Games would resign and suggest that the client commission someone else.

Exhibition

  • Abram Games, Graphic Designer (1914–1996): Maximum Meaning, Minimum Means, Design Museum, London, 2003

References

  1. ^ a b Abram Games, Design museum. Retrieved on 5 August 2009.
  2. ^ a b c Souter, Nick and Tessa (2012). The Illustration Handbook: A Guide to the World's Greatest Illustrators. Oceana. pp. 203. ISBN 978-1-84573-473-2.

Further reading

  • Amstutz, W.Who's Who in Graphic Art (1962. Zurich: Graphis Press)
  • Gombrich, E.H., et al. A. Games: Sixty Years of Design (1990. South Glamorgan, UK: Institute of Higher Education) | ISBN 0-9515777-0-0
  • Livingston, Alan and Isabella The Thames and Hudson Dictionary of Graphic Design and Designers (2003. London: Thames and Hudson) | ISBN 0-500-20353-9
  • Moriarty, Catherine, et al. Abram Games, Graphic Designer: Maximum Meaning, Minimum Means [exhibition catalogue] (2003. London: Lund Humphries) | ISBN 0-85331-881-6
  • Games, Naomi, et al. Abram Games: His Life and Work (2003. New York Princeton Architectural Press) | ISBN 1-56898-364-6
  • Naomi Games, Poster Journeys: Abram Games and London Transport (Capital Transport, Mendlesham, UK)

External links



這本書我可能有2本 不同版
現在手頭有的是第三手的1972年版
有些"引路的說帖" (漢文)

Posters: A Concise History (World of Art)






Posters: A Concise History (World of Art) [Paperback]

John Barnicoat
(Author)


This compelling art book contains beautiful images, illuminating details, and thumbnail sketches of modern art movements. The section titled "Posters and Reality" includes vivid posters and explores the ideas of expressionism, realism, and surrealism in an accessible, yet scholarly manner.
"Posters and Society", however, remains my favorite section. Tracing the evolution of the poster through travel, theater, and liquor ads, Barnicoat explains the significance of outdoor advertising in modern cities. Posters also seem to lend themselves to an ironic, comic style.
Yet the classic posters from World War I and II show that governments can also develop ideas in the popular medium. Wartime posters played a critical role in recruitment of soldiers, selling War Bonds, and instructing civilian populations to conserve precious supplies.
Barnicoat also seems fascinated with the use of posters by communist (Soviet Union, Mao's China, Castro's Cuba) and fascist dictatorships (Nazi)to create "consensus" and the illusion of mass support. He juxaposes these propagnda efforts with the students' posters of May '68 saying "these were attempts to produce a genuine pattern of popular art." (While few propaganda posters have become popular collectibles, wartime posters and protest posters from the 1960s command good prices these days among vintage poster collectors.)
Written in 1973 in a belated celebration of the poster's 100th birthday, this classic art book does show its age - both in the evident leftist sympathies and ignoring recent trends. Posters: A Concise History, however, remains the best introduction for art lovers, graphic designers, and poster collectors.


*****

One hundred years since the 'Golden Age' of posters began

By Allyssia Alleyne, for CNN
September 16, 2014 -- Updated 1609 GMT (0009 HKT)
<a href='http://events.arts.ac.uk/apex/EventFormPage?id=a0RD000000AkEKEMA3&book=true' target='_blank'>"Alan Kitching and Monotype: Celebrating the centenary of five pioneers of the poster," </a>an upcoming exhibition at the London College of Communication, celebrates the five most memorable poster artists of the last century. We look back on some of their most exceptional works. (This 1941 Auxiliary Territorial Service poster by Abram Games was quickly recalled when the authorities decided it looked too glamorous.)
"Alan Kitching and Monotype: Celebrating the centenary of five pioneers of the poster," an upcoming exhibition at the London College of Communication, celebrates the five most memorable poster artists of the last century. We look back on some of their most exceptional works. (This 1941 Auxiliary Territorial Service poster by Abram Games was quickly recalled when the authorities decided it looked too glamorous.)
HIDE CAPTION
Pioneers of poster design: Abram Games
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Letterpress artist Alan Kitching and Monotype have joined forces to commemorate five poster design greats with a series of prints
  • Tom Eckersley, Abram Games, FHK Henrion, Josef Müller-Brockmann and Paul Rand were the leading poster artists of the last century
  • Their designs were widely revered by the public and the graphic design community
(CNN) -- 1914 was a good year for poster design.
You'd be forgiven for not knowing it was then that five of the world's top poster designers were born: Tom Eckersley, Abram Games, FHK Henrion, Josef Müller-Brockmann and Paul Rand.
Though they were from different backgrounds and worked separately, the five are largely responsible for bringing modernist design and typeface sensibilities to the world of poster design from the 1940s on.
"It was a sort of Golden Age of the poster," says legendary letterpress designer Alan Kitching.
Letterpress designer and Monotype collaborator Alan Kitching.
Letterpress designer and Monotype collaborator Alan Kitching.
While their names have all but slipped from public memory, a new project from Kitching and Monotype, one of the world's leading typeface design companies, is shining a new light on their revolutionary poster work, 100 years after their birth.
The results: a series of posters fusing each designer's style with Kitching's, and "Alan Kitching and Monotype: Celebrating the centenary of five pioneers of the poster," an exhibition at the London College of Communication for the London Design Festival, that will showcase Kitching's work alongside posters from each designers' estate.
The artist at work
I meet Kitching at his workshop near the London College of Communication. The smell of ink and metal hits you at the door, growing stronger as you move closer to the intimidating printing press in the back. Prints of his work—eye-popping text images in rainbow hues—hang from the walls, the ceiling, a drying line. The hundreds of typeface alphabets he's made and amassed over the years (the largest collection in Europe), from indecipherably small metal nubs to wooden letters the size of a man's forearm, are filed away in stacked tiers, and leaned against walls. His only computer is a first-generation MacBook he uses to check emails.
Over the last 50 years, Kitching has built a reputation as one of the world's most acclaimed letterpress designers. And like the designers he's commemorating, he's inspired by the beauty of type.
Alan Kitching at work on his Monotype prints in his London workshop.
COURTESY PHIL SAYER
"The printed word is still powerful," he says. "I wanted to take letterpress technology and move it somewhere else from when it used to be useful."
This dedication to type as art is evident in the prints he created for the collaboration. The colorful posters meld Kitching's penchant for monograms ("I like that idea of monograms: two letters interacting to make a third image,") with each designer's spirit. Their influences resonate like a baseline: Games' initials feature the bold font made famous by his posters for the Auxiliary Territorial Service (the women's branch of the British army) during World War II; Rand's feature the colorful simplicity that he would later bring to children's books.
Posters, now and then
Kitching is quick to distinguish his posters from those being commemorated. While he has done functional posters, most of his have been designed as prints, strictly things of beauty. But earlier in the 20th-century, when the designers were first breaking ground in graphic design, posters were society's primary form of communication.
"There were no other means of getting your message out there then. It was just posters," he says.
In a time before the ubiquity of photography (let alone Photoshop), good design was paramount. It was all about the "interpretation of an idea in a graphic way."
They were masters of condensing down a problem to a single cool item with bang.
Alan Kitching
For these artists, this interpretation was realized through geometric shapes, meaningful text and inventive use of color. The diversity of their work proved these principles could be applied for almost any cause, from Eckersley's simple-but-effective posters for the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, to Rand and Henrion's branding work for IBM and KLM respectively; from Games'provocative war propaganda to Müller-Brockmann's geometric orchestra adverts.
"There's nothing between the message and the image. At a glance, you've got it. You didn't need a lot of words. The image is the message," Kitching says. "That's what they were masters of: condensing down a problem to a single cool item with bang."
Abram Games in his studio with his controversial ATS poster, circa 1940.
HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES
The public generally responded positively (Games' Guinness posters were universal favorites), but each designer received their share of push-back. One of Games' ATS recruitment posters was recalled after only a few weeks because authorities thought the glamorous woman shown sent the wrong message about the war effort, and another depicting a young boy in poverty was banned by Winston Churchill himself for being too negative.
The others' posters were derided for being too strange, too modern, and too ugly.
"A lot of people didn't recognize the things they did," Kitching explains. "They thought they were too advanced, too modern because they were working ahead of their time, really."
Even now, people look back at them and say, 'That was a great time to be doing posters.
Alan Kitching
Yet somehow their legacy survives.
The end of an era
Much has changed since Eckersley, Games, Henrion, Müller-Brockmann, and Rand elevated the poster to high art. Changing technology has rendered their methods obsolete, and posters have had to become more brash and stylized to keep the public's attention.
"A lot of things today have very fleeting life. It's ephemeral. It comes out quickly and it certainly doesn't last that long," Kitching says.
But the appeal of these modernist designs, now decades old, remains. Posters that were quite common during their time now sell for exorbitant prices at auction. And to Kitching and other designers, they are a vestige of another time when a handful of great designers ruled supreme.
"They were regarded as the high professional designers of the world," Kitching says. "Even now, people look back at them and say, 'That was a great time to be doing posters.'"
Alan Kitching will be speaking about the designers at Five Lives in Posters: A Panel Discussion at the London College of Communication on September 18, 2014.

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